Therapist Spotlight: Ashley Hunt, LSW

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Ashley Hunt is a Licensed Social Worker with experience working with adults, adolescents, and families. She has extensive experience working with individuals who have experienced various forms of trauma, including childhood trauma, perinatal depression, anxiety, and grief and loss. Read her full bio here.

Ashley works from our River West office. To schedule an appointment with her, please contact our intake department.

What self-care techniques or activities do you do?

I work out 5-6 days a week, often before work. A good workout gives me energy to get through my day.

What made you become a therapist?

I have found that most people just want to be heard, and often feel that their concerns, worries, and insecurities fall on deaf ears. I have felt unheard by those in my own life and wanted to be able to be somebody that knows how to be present; and understands the power in listening and validation

What are your specialties?

I have extensive trauma experience and specialize in addressing depression and anxiety. I have experience with grief and loss, terminal illness, perinatal loss, and challenges pre/post pregnancy.

Did you have a career before becoming a therapist?

I have always worked in the field, but before becoming a therapist I was an advocate and counselor in Brooklyn’s District Attorney’s Office and have worked as a community and medical social worker at several agencies in the Chicagoland area.

Why do you believe that counseling can help?

I believe counseling can help because people are often afraid to admit, even to themselves, what their struggles are. Counseling creates a safe, nonjudgemental space that allows clients to be honest with themselves; which is often the most challenging form of honesty. I truly believe that people can only grow once they have begun to have an honest conversation with themselves.

Why is it important to seek counseling?

I believe it is important to seek counseling because it is normal to teeter between the ‘what ifs’ in life. The unknown can be daunting and anxiety provoking; without counseling, fears derived from the unknown can become overwhelming and take over. Counseling allows a person to acknowledge their fears, recognize they are anxious, but also helps them find the balance in not becoming consumed by fear.